Procedural RPG World Generation

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Having now completed my MSc, below is a brief summary of my dissertation project along with galleries and a video of the prototype. There’s also a download of the full report detailing the implementation process along with background on the topic for those interested in procedural content generation or studying something related.

Report:

671 Downloads

Video:

Since the days of Rogue, and Elite, games have utilised various procedural content generation techniques to create game worlds for players to explore, freeing developers from the hand-crafted approach typically seen in the majority of games. For me, it was the second Elder Scrolls game, Daggerfall in ’96 that inspired me enough to prompt this topic choice for my MSc dissertation project. Although Daggerfall was most certainly a flawed game, the sheer size of the game world is still unsurpassed even today, being roughly 162 square kilometers (about half the size of the Great Britain) and featuring over 15,000 towns, villages and dungeons. An amusing rumor is that it’s so big that you can fit every other subsequent Elder Scrolls game world into a pixel on Daggerfall’s world map.

When you have a game world that big, procedural content generation (PCG) is the only feasible way to populate it. Daggerfall’s world was generated ‘offline’ and shipped on the game media, making the world the same every time you played it. It’s main story-line areas and characters were hand-crafted, but the rest of its towns, dungeons and wilderness areas were all generated.

Scale comparison of the Elder Scrolls games.

Scale comparison of the Elder Scrolls games.

What I wanted to do, is to tackle a project that aimed to generate an RPG world in real-time so each world would be unique, and ultimately create an explorable 3D RPG world generator. What I actually wanted to do was create a full RPG game to play within these generated worlds (i.e. my dream game), but clearly this would never have been feasible in the time-frame and so I settled for a compromise by removing any game mechanics or AI from the project, effectively stripping out the ‘game’ aspect. Even with this, the project workload was going to be ridiculous considering I wanted to use my own DirectX engine and use it to generate the world, complete with dungeons, NPC towns and a day/night cycle.

Unlike most of my previous projects, there wasn’t going to be much focus on graphics and that actually fit nicely with my retro vision for a more modern looking Daggerfall-esque game, complete with sprites…lots of sprite.

My report can be found at the top of this post if you’re curious about some of the techniques I used in the prototype. I had little knowledge of how other games have really approached this from a technical point of view, other that what I had uncovered during my research on the topic. The developed prototype is therefore very much my own approach.

Since, the detail is all in the above report, I’ll just briefly mention some of the techniques the prototype involved:

The world generation itself was created using a procedural noise technique to generate a height-map. Multiple octaves of value noise are combined (Fractional Brownian motion) to create a resulting fractal noise suitable for generating realistic terrain formations. The noise implementation I used was specifically Voronoise, a method that combines a value grid-based noise type and a ‘jittered’ grid version of Voronoi (cellular noise) into an single adjustable function. I introduced a seed value into the noise generation to allow for reproducibility of worlds, given the same seed. The height-map is output in the pixel shader to a render target upon generation, and then used during the tessellation shader stages via patch control-point displacement when rendering the world.

fBM3

Summation of noise octaves.

terrains

A variety of generated worlds.

The prototype’s generated world size is not huge like Daggerfall, but it’s a fair size at around 16,777 square km. That’s a little under half the size of Skyrim’s world for example, but for a little prototype I’m happy with this and it still allows plenty of explorable terrain using the appropriate movement speed and not the super fast one as seen in my video!

Dungeons use a completely different generation method that I implemented off the top of my head after looking into various techniques. It’s an agent-based technique that uses diggers to burrow out corridors and rooms, with various rules thrown in to keep them in-check to ensure they generate sensible looking dungeons. They are also responsible for spawning the dungeons contents which include monsters and treasure chests and the up and down stairs. Here are some ASCII representations of the dungeon layouts generated by the method:

dungeons

The world is divided up into 32×32 terrain chunks that are each responsible for hosting their respective game objects such as flora, fauna, towns and dungeon entrances. For performance purposes frustum culling was a necessity due to the large scale of the terrain, and only chunks visible in the frustum are processed. Each chunk has a chance of creating towns and/or dungeons and checks such as suitably flat terrain are important factors in determining this. Each building performs a suitability check on the terrain mesh at a chosen spot to see if its within the gradient threshold, and if so places a random structure. If enough buildings are present in a town, NPCs will spawn within proximity of the town.

I added a few small graphical enhancements to the game such as faked atmospheric scattering, fog, layered sky domes, water and emission mapped buildings at night. They are each detailed in the report, but ultimately time was limited and any graphical enhancements were really a secondary concern. Despite this, I really wanted to add them and I think it does enough to achieve the overall atmosphere that I had envisaged, as demonstrated in the below comparison with a Daggerfall screenshot:

DaggerfallComparison

Aesthetic comparison between Daggerfall (left) and prototype (right).

The prototype initially starts into the table view where a map of the generated world is shown that can be rotated and zoomed in/out for examination. At a key press the camera moves into the first-person mode and plonks the player into the world. Worlds can be generated in first-person mode but it’s much more intuitive to do it in the table view. By tweaking the various settings in the UI i.e. noise values, town frequency and tree density; worlds can be tailored to whatever style you want, although currently you have to understand each of the noise settings and their influence on the generation process, to create something you have in mind. Failing that though, there’s trial and error. Ultimately, I’ll add predefined terrain settings that can be selected to simplify this process since it’s really not intuitive to know how ‘lacunarity’, ‘gain’ or ‘frequency’ for instance will effect the world, but academically, it’s quite useful to have them directly tweak-able. A seed value can be directly entered into the UI, with every unique value resulting in a unique world.

I hope at some point to continue with the project. There will be a hiatus for the foreseeable future while I work on other things. There is near infinite scope for the project, with so many things to add so it’s likely something I can keep coming back to.

I also produced a nifty tool for visualising noise which could have various uses for demoing. I’ll probably get this uploaded with a download of the prototype itself at some point.

As detailed in the report, the prototype uses various art assets (models/textures) sourced online via Creative Commons license. The project is for non-commercial use and many art assets are effectively placeholders used to finish the prototype during my studies.

 

 

Update and MSc Results

It’s been 8 months since my last post and since then I have become a dad, completed my masters, relocated and become a programmer in the games industry! So, there’s been much to talk about but little time to do it. It’s been a crazy year.

Work is keeping me extremely busy, as is family life, so with what little time I do get I tend to try and keep my hand in with gaming. Having said this, I have a large backlog of games to play through including Fallout 4 which I’ve yet to even install. Due to all the above, this blogs been a little abandoned, though it’s served a very useful purpose of helping to display my portfolio and get me a job, something I’d strongly recommend any aspiring game developer to do. I’ll endeavor to post more now I have my weekends back and hopefully useful things and not just…stuff? Hopefully I’ll be getting back into some hobby programming projects I’m wanting to do such as some WebGL ray tracing stuff for this site, and I’m sure I can put some good tutorials together that will benefit all.

So, university then. It’s over. Done. 4 years of very hard toil and the question is was it worth it? A resounding YES, is the answer of course. I’m lucky now that I’m in a position where 4 years ago I was hoping to be, building invaluable experience working in industry.

The University of Hull has provided an excellent place of learning over the course of my BSc and MSc and importantly opened the doors needed to get me into what is a highly competitive industry. I’d like to thank all of the lectures, supervisors and staff that I’ve worked with over the years who made it a very positive experience. A good university is of course important in determining how much you take away from your time studying, but I will say that THE most important thing is your determination and self-motivation. You can coast through a CompSci degree, and take very little from it. Hopefully my grades demonstrate the fact I put my all into it, and at times, particularly in the MSc, the work load was intense. Intense like driving home at dawn from the lab having done 16hrs of red bull and vending machine fueled programming, knowing you need to get back to the lab in a few hours to do it all over again.

MSc Results:

Here are the results as per the University’s module results site:

With an overall average of 89.9%, this means I should be comfortably in the distinction category for my masters which I am thrilled about.

The big module for the MSc is the dissertation project and having done a pure graphics project for my BSc in CUDA ray tracing, I decided to suggest my own topic this time around and decided upon procedural content generation in RPG’s, a subject I have long been fascinated with. The scope of the project was massive, including the design and implementation of my own 3D DirectX11 engine and the creation of an explorable procedurally generated world with procedurally generated dungeons. Needless to say, the process nearly killed me and the report writing was also tough going since I was moving house with a new born and also working full-time! Considering all this, I achieved a great deal of what I had set out to do, as well as surprising my two supervisors quite considerably when they saw just how much I managed to get done!

I’ll be aiming to make a separate post regarding the dissertation project soon, as well as putting together some sort of video of it to complete my degree portfolio.

The project I’m currently working on at work is really exciting and I wish I could talk about it, but unfortunately I can’t…yet. I can say that since starting work I’ve done some business orientated Objective-C, worked with Unity and on my current project, I’m working on a very large mixed code-base of mainly C with bits of C++. Lets just say I’m glad I took note of all that hex, bit masking and bit-wise operations you can easily not pay attention to at Uni, despite being very much absent in more modern managed languages and coding styles.

 

 

 

 

Cross-Platform Game Engine

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In the first semester of my MSc Computer Science degree as part of the Games Development Architectures module we were tasked to design and implement a cross-platform game engine. A game would also be made using the engine.

The chosen platforms were a Windows PC and Windows Phone 8 device. I decided that considering Microsoft had developed a Universal Application framework for targeting both of these, I would utilise it. This was good from the point of view that it simplified the cross-platform compatibility, but introduced a few limitations (namely having to work with the Windows RT platform and resultant consequences for dealing with inputs via ‘ref classes’ etc.. Coming from experience with Win32 desktop programs, Windows RT feels very different to program for and much less flexible, but then again Win32 really does need some modernisation.

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Project Details:

  • Engine coded in C++ (Visual Studio).
  • DirectX11 rendering engine component coded from scratch.
  • HLSL shaders.
  • The Universal App framework used to contain the code solution and deploy to both platforms.

We were given a design specification for a simple game called ‘Tunnel Terror’. It involved the player having to control a vehicle/object through a tunnel, avoiding various obstacles. The speed would gradually increase the longer the player survived and any collisions with obstacles would result in death. Score was determined by length of survival. I decided to add various extras including power ups such as coins and a randomised speed-up/slow-down. The game would need to play on both a PC and Windows Phone 8 device, allowing for the differing input controls to play. I decided the PC would utilise keyboard whereas the phone would rely on the accelerometer (tilt) sensor to manoeuvre the player through the tunnel. The PC also required a 2 player mode. Main menu, high score table and game over screens would be needed as well as Multiple camera modes such as first-person, third-person and death fly-by cameras.

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Although marks were given for the game implementation and extra features, much of the module was graded based on the engine design, implementation and accompanying report. My report justified the design based on four principles of games architecture, namely ‘Simplicity’, ‘Reusability’, ‘Abstractness’ and ‘Modularity’. Below is an example of the UML design used for my engines platform independent rendering component, with examples given to how behaviour could be derived for both DirectX and OpenGL.

Renderer

In the report we also had to research how we would have implemented the game on next-generation architecture such as the PlayStation 4 and how the engine would deal with the addition of different kinds of input devices.

There were some marks awarded for graphics quality and since the target platforms were both Microsoft, DirectX11 was used for the graphics. I implemented normal bump mapping to give it a nice look when flying down the tunnel. I also randomly changed the textures of each tunnel section and reset them to the end of the sequence once passing behind the frustum to give the impression of an endless tunnel with non-repeating sections.2

Annoyingly because the game is a Windows Store application there is no runnable executable so without actually publishing it to the Store and getting past all the certification requirements I cannot put it up anywhere to play! What is worse though is that currently I know of no screen capture software that can even record footage of the game running (at a decent FPS), both Fraps and Bandicam do not capture it since it’s not a desktop application. Bandicam does have desktop capture support but this also didn’t seem able to see the game and is not suitable for high frame-rate applications. So, as it stands I can’t make a video of the game running without hardware recording. Hopefully, this is something that won’t always be the case.

I was very pleased with the final engine and received a 92% grade for the module. I have since improved upon it and reused design elements for subsequent modules such as Real-time Graphics. I think a lot of what I coded for this project will be extremely useful going forward.

 

 

 

Bit’s Blitz – Puzzle Game

Bit's Blitz - Puzzle Game

Bit’s Blitz – Puzzle Game

In the third year of my Computer Science BSc (2013) as part of the Commercial Games Development module, we were placed into groups and tasked to produce a computer themed game designed for children. Each of the group members had to produce a game design document, one of which would be chosen for the group to develop. My group consisted of me, Aaron Ridge, Michael Killingbeck, Andrew Woodrow, Joshua Twigg and Alex Lynch.

The group decided to go with my game design which was inspired by the classic puzzle game Chip’s Challenge, with the idea being to reimagine it and modernise the graphics.

Game synopsis:
 “‘Bit’s Blitz’ is a fun 2D puzzle game following the escapades of its protagonist ‘Bit’. The game takes place across a series of levels increasing gradually in difficulty, gradually introducing new game-play elements. The player controls ‘Bit’ around a grid, constrained by a series of maze-like blocks and hazards. ‘Bit’ must successfully collect all the computer components that are scattered around the level and then repair his computer to proceed to the next level.”

Details:
Developed using C# and the XNA framework for the PC platform (Windows XP+).

 

The nice thing about this game design was that we could focus on the puzzle aspect of the game, time and imagination permitting, due to the simple overhead on technical implementation. The tile-based game engine was written from scratch using XNA, utilising XML data structures to store level data and a custom made loader. A cool and free little program called Tiled was used to ‘paint’ the level layout and export it into our XML format. I’d strongly recommend this to any considering 2D tile-based games for constructing levels, having said that, it’s a nice programming exercise to develop your own editor if you get the chance.

All gameplay aspects including animations and particle systems were programmed for the game, using no other libraries except XNA. I designed the game framework based on the State Design Pattern which worked out really well and continue to use it for game development.

With the use of XML and Tiled it allowed us to churn out level designs at an alarming rate and the final product has over 20 levels! Not bad considering the 2 week development time. When giving the presentation of the game, we literally only had time to demonstrate about 5 of the best levels, odd considering level variety tends to be in short supply for prototypes.

Sound effects were added (free assets) however I’ve removed these from the video and added music since honestly, they weren’t brilliant! The above gameplay video demonstrates various levels (played by me). I could barely remember most of the levels so it’s pretty much a blind play-through with some genuine mistakes.

For the project we all chipped in and the group worked well together. The game was never released or published anywhere, though if anyone is interested I could stick the executable on here for download.

Solar System Orrery – HTML5 Canvas

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Orrery Zoom

For quite a while I’ve been trying to get around to arranging some web hosting and putting my solar system Orrery online for people to access, I’m pleased to say I’ve finally got around to doing it.

(Click here to go to the Interactive Orrery)

The project was part of the 2D Graphics module course work for my Computer Science degree. It’s written in Javascript and utilizes the powerful HTML5 canvas for rendering.

It’s not an accurate scientific representation, however the planets distances are to scale in relation to each other (not in relation to the sun) and the frequency each planet completes a full orbit (year) is also accurate to real life. There are two orbit modes ‘circular’ and ‘elliptical’ and also two simulation modes where acceleration and velocity is calculated based on the mass each object and thus the force of gravity. One simulation mode keeps the Sun centered while the planets orbit around, the second mode allows the sun to be affected by it’s orbiting bodies.

elliptical

It’s really a bit of fun and you can create new planets of enormous size by simply holding down your mouse on the simulation until your happy with the size and let go and watch how all orbiting bodies are affected. You can also flick the planet when your holding it at the same time of release to set its starting velocity (seems to work much better in chrome then IE). I also highly recommend running it in full-screen mode by pressing ‘W’ if you have a reasonable spec system.

Another cool thing is the zoom feature, if you pause the program via ‘P’ you can scroll around with the cursor keys and take a look at some of the relatively hi-res images I used for each planet. The Earth and orbiting Moon is pretty cool to zoom right into as pictured above.

Detailed instructions are available on the page. Please check it out here and have a play around: www.alexrodgers.co.uk/orrery

simulation

Exchange Reports Project Overview

During this summer, in-between semesters I was fortunate enough to get a software development job for a local company just 10 minutes walk from my door. The project was to produce an ‘Exchange Reports’ system that would provide email messaging statistics exactly to the customers specification. The system would be automated so that after reports were designed, they would be generated programmatically by a service and emailed to any recipients that had been setup to receive each report. The solution was to be comprised of 3 distinct programs that would need to be developed along with configuration tools to setup the non-GUI processes in the solution (namely the services).

I have produced the following diagram to demonstrate the solutions processes, ( Click to enlarge):

The design was in place when I started and an existing code-base was also present, but still required the vast majority of the functionality to be added. It was the first time having worked professionally as a software engineer and therefore also the first time getting to grips with existing code made by developers no longer around. More so, understanding the solutions technical proposal well enough to execute exactly what the customer and my employer wanted. I think working in IT professionally for a lot of years certainly helped me get into a comfortable stride after an initial information overload when taking on solely what was a surprisingly large but beneficial technical project compared to what I had envisioned. Being thrown into the deep end is probably the fastest way you can improve and I feel that above all, I have taken a lot from this experience which will prove valuable in the future. I’m very pleased with the outcome and successfully got all the core functionality in and finished in the time frame that was assigned. I whole heartily would encourage students thinking of getting professional experience to go for it, ideally with an established company from which you can learn a great deal. Having experienced developers around to run things by is great way to improve.

Now onto the technical details. The project was coded in C# and used WinForms for initial testing of processes and later for the configuration programs. I used a set of third-party .NET development tools from ‘DevExpress’ that proved to be fantastic and a massive boon to those wanting to create quick and great looking UI’s with reporting functionality. SQL Server provided the relational database functionality, an experience I found very positive and very much enjoyed the power of Query Language when it came to manipulating data via .NET data tables, data adapters, table joins or just simple direct commands.

Using the diagram as a reference, I’ll briefly go through each process in the solution for A) those interested in such things and B) future reference for myself while it’s still fresh in my mind because i’ll likely forget much of how the system works after a few months of 3D graphics programming and Uni coursework :P.

Exchange Message Logs: 

In Exchange 2010 Message Tracking logs can be enabled quite simply and provide a wealth of information that can be used for analysis and reporting if so desired. They come in the form of comma delimited log files that can be opened simply with a text editor. They have been around a lot of years and in the past during IT support work I have found myself looking at them from time to time to diagnose various issues. This time I’d be using them as the source of data for a whole reporting system. The customer was a large international company and to give an example from just one Exchange system they were producing 40 MB-worth of these messaging logs each day. With these being effectively just text files that’s an awful lot of email data to deal with.

Processing Service: 

The first of 3 core components of the solution, the Processing Service as the name suggests is an install-able Windows Service that resides on a server with access to the Exchange Messaging log files. The service is coded to run daily at a specified time and it’s purpose is comprised of 5 stages:

1. Connect to the Exchange server and retrieve a list of users from the Global Address List (GAL). This is done using a third-party Outlook library called ‘Redemption’ that enables this information to be extracted and then check it for any changes to existing users and/or any new users. The users are placed in a table on the SQL database server and will be used later to provide full name and department information for each email message we store.

2. Next, each Exchange Message log is individually parsed and useful messaging information is extracted and stored into various tables on the database server. Parsed log file names are kept track of in the database  to prevent reading logs more than once.

3. Any message forwards or replies are identified and tallied up.

4. A separate Summary table on the database is populated with data processed from the prior mentioned message tables. This table is what the reports will look at to generate data. Various calculations are made such as time difference between an email being received and then forwarded or replied to gauge estimates of response times being just one example; a whole plethora of fields are populated in this table, much more than could comfortably fit on a single report. Due to this large amount of potentially desirable data we later allow the user to select which fields they want from the Summary table in the ‘Report Manager’ if they wish to create a custom report or alternatively and more typically, they use predefined database ‘Views’ that have been created for them based on the customers specification which allows them to access only the data they need. Database Views are a really neat feature.

5. The databases Messaging tables are scoured for old records beyond a threshold period and deleted. This maintenance is essential to prevent table sizes growing too large. Their associated Summary data that has been generated is still kept however but I added functionality to archive this by serializing this data off and deleting it from the database if required.

Report Manager:

Initially we had thought to utilise DevExpress’s ‘Data Grid’ object controls in a custom Form application but we decided that the appearance of the reports that were generated from this were not satisfactory. This turned out to be a good design decision since we later discovered DevExpress has remarkable reporting controls that allow very powerful design and presentation features that completely overshadowed that of the Data Grids. After some migrating of code from the old ‘Report Manager’ program and having to spend a day or two researching and familiarising myself with the DevExpress API I had a great looking new application that the customer will be using to design and manage the reports.

Report Manager program

Report Manager program

The Report Manager allows you to design every aspect of a report through an intuitive drag and drop interface. Images and various graphics can also be added to beautify the design, though that wasn’t something I did nor had the time to attempt! The data objects can be arranged as desired and the ‘data source’ information for the report is saved along with it’s design layout via a neat serialization function inherent to the ‘XtraReport’ object in the DevExpress library which is then stored in a reports table on the database server for later loading or building. You can also generate the report on-the-fly and export it into various formats such as PDF or simply print it. Another neat built-in feature is the ability to issue SQL query commands using a user-friendly filter for non-developers in the report designer which is then stored along with the layout, thus the user designing the report has absolute control over the data i.e a quick filter based on Department being “Customer Services” would return only that related message data without me needing to code in some method to do this manually like was the case when using the Data Grids.

In the top left you’ll see specific icons that provide the necessary plumbing for the database server. ‘Save’, ‘Save As’ and ‘Load’ respectively writes the serialized report layout to the database, creates a new record with said layout or loads an existing saved report from the database into the designer. Loading is achieved by retrieving the list of report records stored in the reports table and placing it into a Data Grid control on a form where you can select a report to load or delete. The ‘Recipients’ button brings up the interface to manage adding users who want to receive the report by email, this retrieves the user data imported by the Processing Service and populates a control that allows you to search through and select a user or manually type a name and email address to add a custom recipient. Additionally, upon adding a recipient to the report you must select whether they wish to receive the report on a daily, weekly or monthly basis. This information is then stored in the aptly named recipient table and then relates to the reports via a reportID field.

Report Service:

Nearly there (if you’ve made it this far well done), the last piece in the solution is another Windows Service called the ‘Report Service’. This program sits and waits to run as per a schedule that can be determined by a configuration app that i’ll mention shortly. Like the Processing Service, as part of it’s logic, it needs to check if it’s the right time of the day to execute the program, of course the service continuously polls itself every few minutes to see if this is the case. Upon running it looks to see if it’s the right day for daily reports, day of week for weekly reports, or day of month for the (you guessed it) monthly reports. If it is, it then it runs and grabs the ‘joined’ data from the reports and recipient tables and proceeds to build each report and fire them out as PDF email attachments to the associated recipients. It makes a final note of the last time it ran to prevent it repeatedly running on each valid day.

Configuration Tools:

Two configuration apps were made, one for the Processing Service and one for the Report Service. These two services have no interfaces since they run silently in the background, so I provided a method via an XML settings file and the two apps to store a variety of important data such as SQL connection strings, server authentication details (encrypted) and additionally also through the need to provide certain manual debugging options that may need to be executed as well as providing an interface to set both services run times and the report delivery schedule.

Screens below (click to enlarge):

So that’s the solution start to finish, depending on time I’m told it’s possible it could be turned into a product at some point which would be great since other customers could potentially benefit from it too.

The great thing about a creative industry like programming, whether business or games, is that you’re ultimately creating a product for someone to use. It’s nice to know people somewhere will be getting use and function out of something you have made and just one reason why I’ve thoroughly enjoyed working on the project. I’ve learned a lot from my colleagues while working on it and hope to work with them again. You also get a taste for real life professional development and how it differs in various ways to academic teachings, which although are very logical and sensible are also idealistic (and rightly so) but in the real-world when time is money and you need to turn around projects to sustain the ebb and flow of business, you have to do things in a realistic fashion that might mean cutting some corners when it comes to programming or software design disciplines. I always try my best to write as clean code as possible and this was no exception but ultimately you need to the get the project done first and foremost and it’s interesting how that can alter the way software development pans out with regards perhaps to niceties like extensive documentation, ‘Use Case’ diagrams and robust unit testing potentially falling to to the wayside in favor of a more speedy short-term turn around. Certainly I imagine, larger businesses can afford to manage these extra processes to great effect, but for small teams of developers it’s not always realistic, which I can now understand.

Hypermorph Wins Three Thing Game Competition

So it’s been a frantic couple of weeks, plenty of course-work to do and last weekend was the much anticipated Three Thing Game competition. For anyone not in the know this is held each semester at Hull University and challenges teams to come up with a game based around three auctioned words per team. Judges then score based on the games relevance to the words and the quality/fun of the game. The competition involves a marathon 24 hour programming session to get your game finished on the day. This one was the biggest yet with 39 teams competing. We really couldn’t have asked for better “Things” because a combination of good bidding and luck meant we came out with “Flying”, “Tank” and “Bombs”. Considering another team got “Teddy bear”,  “Deodorant”  and “Pop Tart” I think we did ok!

Last year we came second with Shear Carnage and and I can say that honestly this year, we really really wanted to win it. This was evident to myself just by the focus we had this year and when the day of the competition came, I think I probably left my seat half a dozen times in the whole 24 hours! In hindsight we probably took it far too seriously and as a result I think it sacrificed a lot of the enjoyment of the competition and resulted in some contention regarding ideas that seemed inevitable considering vested interests and no one leader within the team. I think on a personal note, much was learnt regarding team work and there are aspects of the planning and design process I would do differently next time. Luckily it all turned out worth it in the end and so it’s very hard to regret any decisions, but this was by no means a painless endeavour!

Me on the right, Russ in the middle, John on the left. Lee Stott at the back.

So to the game, Hypermorph is a retro-style side scrolling shooter that takes me back to my childhood days, playing classics such as Xenon 2, R-Type and Menace on the Amiga. Back then the shoot’em’up was a staple video game genre and was hugely popular, now only since the mobile platforms have taken off is the genre again feasible because it’s the perfect style of game to have a quick blast on when wanting to pass a little bit of time. The  thing that’s pretty novel in Hypermorph is the ability for the player to switch between two different forms, a spaceship and a hover tank by simply tapping the screen. We made the game using XNA (C#) for the Windows Phone 7 and coded everything ourselves (no third party libraries).

I produced the art for the game and managing both the art and doing a lot of the programming was a challenge in itself on the day, resulting in most of the art being done in the last few hours. I had a good idea in my head what the game would look like when we were bouncing the initial idea around, however my regret was that I didn’t produce any concept art for it sooner to put the rest of the team at ease; for a long time I think we were left with our own ideas for how the game would look but once I came up with the first concept drawing for the ship, the team were all in favour to my relief!

We had decided to make the game quite dark and moody but with bright weapon and explosion effects to make them really stand out. Additionally, we wanted to make the controls as hands off as possible. We learned from Shear Carnage that using touch too frequently can result in obscuring a lot of the screen so we instead went for a tilt based movement for the player and a single touch to morph between Tank and Spaceship. Importantly we set it to auto-fire constantly since you soon realise that in this genre there’s never a time you don’t want to be firing.

One feature I’m really pleased we put in was the voice effects for powerups and various other things. It adds a lot to the immersion and again, really goes back to the genres roots.

Of course we have plans to get Hypermorph out on both the WP7 and Windows 8 market ASAP but uni coursework is currently being prioritised. At the competition was Lee Stott from Microsoft and guys from the Monogame team. Lee’s encouragement was inspiring and I’d also like to thank him and Microsoft for providing the cool prizes. The Monogame guys were brilliant and we spent a fair time chatting with them regarding getting our games ported to the various platforms, they even ported Shear Carnage and my Robocleaner game for us to show us how easy it is! (albeit there’s some coding required to get them ready for the marketplace).

Ultimately we are going to want to put in a few more levels, enemy types, weapons and powerups before getting it on the marketplace, but the good news is it will most certainly be free!

All in all it was overwhelming and the encouragement we have received from Lee Stott, Rob Miles and the MonoGame guys was great. Ultimately this is why I gave up a career in IT to get into the games industry, because there’s so much satisfaction in putting your heart and soul into producing a game and then seeing others get a lot enjoyment from it. Winning the Peoples Choice award as well as the judges award was the icing on the cake and I’d like to thank everyone who voted for us and gave us great feedback.

Stay tuned for more Hypermorph news soon…

Robocleaner out on Windows Phone

Finally Robocleaner is now available for download on the Windows Phone marketplace. Check it out, feedback welcome. There’s a “try” option to play the first 3 levels on each mode for free and the Online Leaderboards function in the trial mode too.

MS Store Link: http://www.windowsphone.com/en-gb/apps/06793bef-a8f3-4b25-a325-4e12b598f4df

As my first solo title that I’ve worked on it was a great learning process and gave me a good idea how tough it must be being a full-time indie developer, especially if your a one-man team doing design, coding, graphics and sound. It’s certainly encouraged me to continue and it’s a shame that XNA is pretty much being dropped in WP8 since a lot of the XNA specific skills I’ve picked up may not be much use in the future (without Monogame at least).

My aim for the next couple of semesters at Uni with time permitting, is to work on more mobile game titles, likely simpler ones (Shear Carnage) with less physics and AI coding. One thing I learned is that just because you have a cool path-finding or a realistic wall bounce algorithm, it may be technically impressive but it really doesn’t impact the game overall and it’s better probably to make games where more complex mechanics aren’t required to make the game fun. I do enjoy doing AI and the physics side of things but with mobile games, it’s better to get the game done ASAP and out on the market so people can have fun playing it. Next time I’ll be aiming to get two games released in the time it took me to make Robocleaner!

Robocleaner Update..

So, I’ve been progressing with getting my Robocleaner game on the marketplace (I’ve renamed the game from Sweepy Cleaner for originalities sake). It’s been taking a lot longer then initially I thought it would mainly because I wanted to completely redo the graphics and as anyone will find, graphics can be quite time consuming. On the plus side my knowledge of making graphics and using Photoshop and Illustrator has increased ten-fold.

Things I’ve added so far:

A menu system with options for muting sound and changing the control type from tilt to touch. Touch being useful if your not upright when playing. I also improved slightly my background image and removed the eyes from my hoover. Less is clearly more when it comes to hoover eyes since I think my Cyclopean hoover looks more bad ass then when it had two and actually it’s eye is now what used to be it’s nose :)

So far I’ve only made 4 levels out of 8. I’ve got the living room, bathroom, dining room and kitchen finished. I’m trying my best to make each room quite unique to the last and also slightly increase the difficulty as you progress, mainly by introducing more clutter and extra  stuff that harms you.

Bathroom

I’ve added Hazards which are like regular furniture except you can pass straight through them while taking damage e.g water, spilt coffee, broken glass etc..

Additionally a new little chap I’ve added which I’m quite pleased with is a Dust Goblin, he roams around the maps he’s on and if he comes into contact with any dust, he turns it into a Dust Bomb that he hurls at you, if it hits you, you take damage and you also die outright if you touch the goblin. He adds a significant challenge to the game and in later levels there will be multiple goblins, potentially of different types!

I’ve added decorative particle effects into some of the levels to add a bit of realism. In the bathroom for example, the bath tap is running and there’s steam and water droplets splashing onto the floor and on the kitchen map there’s a kettle with steam particles being puffed out.

Sometimes adding cool little things like the particle effects that don’t take much effort can make a nice difference to the polish of a game so I like to add them. You just have to limit yourself on some things otherwise the game would never get finished. Luckily the programming is pretty minimal at the moment since most was done for my course work (except the new stuff) and adding levels is just a few lines of code or less depending on what objects are present in it.

So there it is so far, hopefully I’ll get the other 4 levels done soon and can get it on the  marketplace asap with maybe an on-line scoreboard and time related scores for each level. It’s certainly a nice feeling seeing the game come together and hopefully not just be a uni coursework submission but an standalone fun little game.