Procedural RPG World Generation

Having now completed my MSc, below is a brief summary of my dissertation project along with galleries and a video of the prototype. There’s also a download of the full report detailing the implementation process along with background on the topic for those interested in procedural content generation or studying something related.

Report:

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Video:

Since the days of Rogue, and Elite, games have utilised various procedural content generation techniques to create game worlds for players to explore, freeing developers from the hand-crafted approach typically seen in the majority of games. For me, it was the second Elder Scrolls game, Daggerfall in ’96 that inspired me enough to prompt this topic choice for my MSc dissertation project. Although Daggerfall was most certainly a flawed game, the sheer size of the game world is still unsurpassed even today, being roughly 162 square kilometers (about half the size of the Great Britain) and featuring over 15,000 towns, villages and dungeons. An amusing rumor is that it’s so big that you can fit every other subsequent Elder Scrolls game world into a pixel on Daggerfall’s world map.

When you have a game world that big, procedural content generation (PCG) is the only feasible way to populate it. Daggerfall’s world was generated ‘offline’ and shipped on the game media, making the world the same every time you played it. It’s main story-line areas and characters were hand-crafted, but the rest of its towns, dungeons and wilderness areas were all generated.

Scale comparison of the Elder Scrolls games.

Scale comparison of the Elder Scrolls games.

What I wanted to do, is to tackle a project that aimed to generate an RPG world in real-time so each world would be unique, and ultimately create an explorable 3D RPG world generator. What I actually wanted to do was create a full RPG game to play within these generated worlds (i.e. my dream game), but clearly this would never have been feasible in the time-frame and so I settled for a compromise by removing any game mechanics or AI from the project, effectively stripping out the ‘game’ aspect. Even with this, the project workload was going to be ridiculous considering I wanted to use my own DirectX engine and use it to generate the world, complete with dungeons, NPC towns and a day/night cycle.

Unlike most of my previous projects, there wasn’t going to be much focus on graphics and that actually fit nicely with my retro vision for a more modern looking Daggerfall-esque game, complete with sprites…lots of sprite.

My report can be found at the top of this post if you’re curious about some of the techniques I used in the prototype. I had little knowledge of how other games have really approached this from a technical point of view, other that what I had uncovered during my research on the topic. The developed prototype is therefore very much my own approach.

Since, the detail is all in the above report, I’ll just briefly mention some of the techniques the prototype involved:

The world generation itself was created using a procedural noise technique to generate a height-map. Multiple octaves of value noise are combined (Fractional Brownian motion) to create a resulting fractal noise suitable for generating realistic terrain formations. The noise implementation I used was specifically Voronoise, a method that combines a value grid-based noise type and a ‘jittered’ grid version of Voronoi (cellular noise) into an single adjustable function. I introduced a seed value into the noise generation to allow for reproducibility of worlds, given the same seed. The height-map is output in the pixel shader to a render target upon generation, and then used during the tessellation shader stages via patch control-point displacement when rendering the world.

fBM3

Summation of noise octaves.

terrains

A variety of generated worlds.

The prototype’s generated world size is not huge like Daggerfall, but it’s a fair size at around 16,777 square km. That’s a little under half the size of Skyrim’s world for example, but for a little prototype I’m happy with this and it still allows plenty of explorable terrain using the appropriate movement speed and not the super fast one as seen in my video!

Dungeons use a completely different generation method that I implemented off the top of my head after looking into various techniques. It’s an agent-based technique that uses diggers to burrow out corridors and rooms, with various rules thrown in to keep them in-check to ensure they generate sensible looking dungeons. They are also responsible for spawning the dungeons contents which include monsters and treasure chests and the up and down stairs. Here are some ASCII representations of the dungeon layouts generated by the method:

dungeons

The world is divided up into 32×32 terrain chunks that are each responsible for hosting their respective game objects such as flora, fauna, towns and dungeon entrances. For performance purposes frustum culling was a necessity due to the large scale of the terrain, and only chunks visible in the frustum are processed. Each chunk has a chance of creating towns and/or dungeons and checks such as suitably flat terrain are important factors in determining this. Each building performs a suitability check on the terrain mesh at a chosen spot to see if its within the gradient threshold, and if so places a random structure. If enough buildings are present in a town, NPCs will spawn within proximity of the town.

I added a few small graphical enhancements to the game such as faked atmospheric scattering, fog, layered sky domes, water and emission mapped buildings at night. They are each detailed in the report, but ultimately time was limited and any graphical enhancements were really a secondary concern. Despite this, I really wanted to add them and I think it does enough to achieve the overall atmosphere that I had envisaged, as demonstrated in the below comparison with a Daggerfall screenshot:

DaggerfallComparison

Aesthetic comparison between Daggerfall (left) and prototype (right).

The prototype initially starts into the table view where a map of the generated world is shown that can be rotated and zoomed in/out for examination. At a key press the camera moves into the first-person mode and plonks the player into the world. Worlds can be generated in first-person mode but it’s much more intuitive to do it in the table view. By tweaking the various settings in the UI i.e. noise values, town frequency and tree density; worlds can be tailored to whatever style you want, although currently you have to understand each of the noise settings and their influence on the generation process, to create something you have in mind. Failing that though, there’s trial and error. Ultimately, I’ll add predefined terrain settings that can be selected to simplify this process since it’s really not intuitive to know how ‘lacunarity’, ‘gain’ or ‘frequency’ for instance will effect the world, but academically, it’s quite useful to have them directly tweak-able. A seed value can be directly entered into the UI, with every unique value resulting in a unique world.

I hope at some point to continue with the project. There will be a hiatus for the foreseeable future while I work on other things. There is near infinite scope for the project, with so many things to add so it’s likely something I can keep coming back to.

I also produced a nifty tool for visualising noise which could have various uses for demoing. I’ll probably get this uploaded with a download of the prototype itself at some point.

As detailed in the report, the prototype uses various art assets (models/textures) sourced online via Creative Commons license. The project is for non-commercial use and many art assets are effectively placeholders used to finish the prototype during my studies.

 

 

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